child therapy

What we can learn from Children's Books

Some of you may not know this but I’m self-publishing my first children’s book this spring which celebrates different types of families. The world of children’s book authors, illustrators, and readers is a special one and I spent most of January checking out some great books. Below are some of my favorite children’s books that have special messages for all of us.

Moon by Alison Oliver- Moon is the story of a young girl who forgets what it’s like to be wild and free. She has a strict schedule of school, homework, music lessons, and tutoring. Her schedule resembles many students I work with. In this beautifully illustrated book, Moon meets Wolf who shows her how to be playful and spontaneous. This story reminds us all the simple pleasure of play and the amazing sense of freedom that can come from being present in the moment.

The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson- There are many reasons to feel different. This book reminds us that it’s hard to take that first (often vulnerable) step to let others get to know us.

The Remember Balloons by Jessie Oliveros- It can be hard for children to understand what happens to family members and other loved ones who are affected by dementia. This book helps to explain what happens to memories by using balloons as a metaphor.

Isle of You by David LaRochelle- Adults, teens, and children can all relate to needing a place that helps take your mind off of school, work, and other worries. This book combines creativity and guided imagery to take you to a special place when you are feeling sad, mad, or worried.

Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall- This book celebrates being true to yourself despite what others may think or say.

Support your local independent bookstore by checking out these great reads!

Social Media as a Tool for Good

I first came across this article by Laura Clydesdale over the summer and then Girls Leadership posted it on their Facebook page recently and it reminded me that so much of the talk about social media to parents is that “it’s bad” and “something to be fearful of” and while the second statement may be true on some level, it can also be a powerful tool for good. I wanted to recap some of the points made from this article: https://girlsleadership.org/blog/help-girl-take-back-control-social-media/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=hq-fb&utm_campaign=0518-lc_rox-hq-tr&fbclid=IwAR1_vnM5DNLYBdsezPer9ZyJBhgHV2wED4NUF9gVG8ZXVgJSZed4CYXmnNE

A simple exercise that Dr. Lisa Hinkelman talks about involves asking your daughter 3 words to describe herself, 3 words a close friend might use to describe her, and then seeing how those words stack up to her image on social media. I might also encourage you as her mom or other loving adult to do this same exercise for yourself. What similarities do you notice? What are the differences?

So often, teenage girls (and adult women) want to portray what they think as the ideal. In real life, many teenage girls I’ve done this activity with have described themselves using these words: funny, kind, adventurous, athletic, creative, honest, etc. Those are all amazing qualities and yet with the exception of maybe adventurous and athletic, the social media profiles of those same girls don’t showcase their other attributes. Instead, with just the right filter and angle, their images highlight what’s on the outside, not the inside.

Need more help with some conversation starters about social media, check out: www.mediagirls.org for some great tips.

Written by Kathleen Goodman

Written by Kathleen Goodman